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Tag: Annual Report 2019


Alaska Native leaders, Tribal partners and community members from across the state joined ANTHC’s Board of Directors and executive staff for the Consortium’s Annual Meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 3 at the Dena’ina Civic Center in Anchorage. The Annual Meeting is an exciting event that allows us to discuss our accomplishments and challenges in the last year, while also getting a chance to connect and communicate face to face with our people.  This year’s annual report featured the theme “Health Within ...


New Stuyahok sits on the quiet, rolling hills above the Nushagak River in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska. Like many rural areas in the state, New Stuyahok residents rely on skiffs, snowmachines and all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) for their subsistence hunts and day-to-day travel within the community. There are trucks in New Stuyahok, but they are about as rare as tall trees on the tundra. As the hunting seasons change, so too do the ways residents reach these lands. ...


The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium’s largest division, the Alaska Native Medical Center (ANMC), was recently deemed “Meritorious” for outstanding quality scores in eight surgical care outcome areas. Nationwide, the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP®) recognized 88 of the 592 eligible hospitals participating in the adult program this year. ANMC was the only hospital recognized in Alaska. ACS NSQIP participating hospitals are required to track the outcomes of inpatient and outpatient surgical procedures in ...


Bleeding is the leading cause of preventable death after injury. In an emergency, someone can bleed to death in as little as three minutes before help arrives. Due to the vast geography of our state and our penchant for outdoor activities, Alaskans tend to live pretty adventurous lives – which puts us at a higher risk for injury. Unfortunately, we also live in a world where mass shootings and terrorist attacks are real threats to us all. Why not be ...


It is difficult to see a family member or loved one deal with substance abuse. Often, living close to someone who abuses substances, such as alcohol, drugs or prescription opioids, puts a strain on the entire family. A new therapy being offered in Anchorage at the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA), in partnership with ANTHC, offers hope to families who have someone that suffers from substance abuse. Family members and friends know their loved ones best, making them some of ...


ANTHC and Alaska Pacific University (APU) hosted the first-ever Alaska Indigenous Research Program (AKIRP) in Anchorage. The theme for the program, which was held in May, was Promoting Resilience, Health and Wellness. The research program aims to increase cultural humility and sensitivity of health researchers with emphasis on the importance of Tribally driven and culturally responsive research as well as support and grow Indigenous researchers and scholars. The program included three weeks of courses designed for all levels of research ...